Improve Your Lyrics – Tip #24

Today we are going to talk about the different points of view (separately) when writing lyrics.  It is important to be conscious of the song’s/story’s point of view because you want the intended message to come across to the audience.  For example: if you want to talk about a personal subject, would you be using the word “you?”  Probably not.

For this post, we are going to talk about Third Person.

Third Person is for storytelling because of how objective it is.  If you want to tell of a situation happening to outside characters, the Third Person point of view is the best option.

The following are words used to convey the Third Person point of view:

  • Subject – he, she, it, they
  • Direct Object – him, her, it, them
  • Possessive Adjective – his, her, its, their
  • Possessive Predicate – his, hers, its, theirs

So, if you want to convey the Third Person point of view, keep in mind of using those words above.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read! Feel free to comment, share, and subscribe for more daily tips below! Till next time.

Improve Your Lyrics – Tip #23

Today we are going to talk about the different points of view (separately) when writing lyrics.  It is important to be conscious of the song’s/story’s point of view because you want the intended message to come across to the audience.  For example: if you want to talk about a personal subject, would you be using the word “you?”  Probably not.

For this post, we are going to talk about Second Person.

Second Person has the most intimacy to it, because you are talking directly to another.  However, it needs to be used carefully – you don’t want it to come across like you are a dictator; you want the words to come across as conversational.

The following are words used to convey the Second Person point of view:

  • Subject – you
  • Direct Object – you
  • Possessive Adjective – your
  • Possessive Predicate – yours

So, if you want to convey the Second Person point of view, keep in mind of using those words above.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read! Feel free to comment, share, and subscribe for more daily tips below! Till next time.

Improve Your Lyrics – Tip #22

Today we are going to talk about the different points of view (separately) when writing lyrics.  It is important to be conscious of the song’s/story’s point of view because you want the intended message to come across to the audience.  For example: if you want to talk about a personal subject, would you be using the word “you?”  Probably not.

For this post, we are going to talk about First Person.

First Person has some intimacy to it, but can become objective.  It is also used to talk to the audience about other people, depending on if using and outsider narrative. 

The following are words used to convey the First Person point of view:

  • Subject – I, we
  • Direct Object – me, us
  • Possessive Adjective – my, our
  • Possessive Predicate – mine, ours

So, if you want to convey the First Person point of view, keep in mind of using those words above.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read! Feel free to comment, share, and subscribe for more daily tips below! Till next time.

Improve Your Lyrics – Tip #21

One thing to be mindful of when writing your lyrics is (trying) to keep everything within the same tense… either being the past, present, or future tense.

Of course, you can switch between these with every verse, such as if one verse is in past tense, the next one is in present tense, and finally the last verse is in future). However, having different tenses within the same verse section can sound really awkward and ununiform.

So, here are simple ways on modifying verbs to match the correct tense you are going after:

  • Past: has, had, -ed
  • Present: is -ing, -s
  • Future: will

Another thing you can do is “neutralize” the tense. This is by strictly using the -ing form of the verbs, the to form of the verb, or avoiding all verbs completely. This will accurately make sure everything is in the correct tense, but the audience will have a harder time telling if you are in the past, present, or future.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read! Feel free to comment, share, and subscribe for more daily tips below! Till next time.

Improve Your Lyrics – Tip #20

A quick mindfulness tip when writing and revising your lyrics:

Say that the purpose of your song is to have a “build-up” of thematic material or a load of hints before the final reveal at the end/chorus.

The best way to make a flow with continuity before the big reveal is to make sure one thing is carried over from one verse to the next. This allows for connectivity as well as continuous exponential growth in the thematic details before everything is pieced together in the end/chorus.

Think of each verse as an opportunity to dig a bit deeper into the details of the story. You start at the surface and work your way to the core.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read! Feel free to comment, share, and subscribe for more daily tips below! Till next time.

Improve Your Lyrics – Tip #19

Another quick instalment on how to revise and edit your lyrics:

Objectively, you want your verses and choruses/refrains to be different from another.

Verses are designed to the show the details of the story while choruses/refrains should tell the overall meaning of the story.

Because the chorus is used as a “home-base” to reiterate the meaning to the listener, the verses should have the job to add color.

Basically, ask yourself, “What is the meaning of the song?” and “Does the chorus/refrain alone get the message across?”

If you need the verses as crutches to support the meaning of the song, it means you have a weak chorus. So refine and edit the chorus till the point you have no doubt about it.

As for the verses, they should be connected and related to the overall meaning of the song, but should also be used to express the details.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read! Feel free to comment, share, and subscribe for more daily tips below! Till next time.

Improve Your Lyrics – Tip #18

This is going to be a short piece of advice:

When you a building a bridge to connect two areas together, should the bridge contain a lot of material, a balanced amount, or a bare amount?

Obviously, the answer is a balanced amount.

That is the same mentality you need when writing verses in your song.

Verses, while should be unique from each section, should also have some connection between each. You don’t want a laundry-list of things talked about in your verses that runs on-and-on. Pick a strong theme and stick to it with development.

You don’t a single thread of an idea to be the thing holding the verses together in relation to one another, and you certainly don’t always want to repeat the same things (that can lead to boredom). You want there to be fluidity and strong connectivity from one verse to another.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read! Feel free to comment, share, and subscribe for more daily tips below! Till next time.